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Exclusive Track Premier - Misery Index - The Killing Gods
Tuesday, 22 April 2014 13:43

Sick Drummer Magazine is truly honored to premier the title-track from the forthcoming Misery Index release, 'The Killing Gods.' We have long seen the talent behind this band and the simply relentless drumming of Adam Jarvis, so to see them continue on this path of success and leadership is nothing shocking to us here at SDM. Adam continues to pummel us with music not only from Misery Index, but from Pig Destroyer, Fulgora, Asthma Castle, Clenched Fist and who knows what will be next. A hard-hitting, incredibly fast drummer with style is very hard to find, but look no further... He has arrived.
 
Misery Index's new album 'The Killing Gods' distills almost fifteen years of relentless touring, recording, and writing into one of 2014's best extreme metal albums. 'The Killing Gods' twelve tracks (including the 5 part, fifteen-minute, album opener "Faust"), are a crucial exercise in veracity; eschewing superfluous parts or studio trickery for brutal economy and effect. Riff after riff drips with malevolence, while the band's dual vocal assault transmits the chaos of a dystopian society gone mad. As 'The Killing Gods' proves from start to finish, Misery Index have crossed the threshold into death metal greatness. Photo by Josh Sisk.
 
 
 
Pre order 'The Killing Gods' herehttp://shopusa.season-of-mist.com/
 
For any fan of metal history, go order the new book 'Extremity Retained,' by Jason Netherton of Misery Index! I have read through it and thoroughly enjoyed it. A 475 page collection of stories, memories, anecdotes and interviews that will allow you to better understand how the death metal underground worked in its early incarnations, how it has evolved, and where it might be going.
 
 
Stay tuned for an Isolated drum track from Adam Jarvis that will soon be added to our Isolating The Throne section on the site.
 

 
Chris Reifert - Autopsy - After The Cutting - Isolating The Throne
Saturday, 12 April 2014 16:46
Death Metal Legends, Chris Reifert and Autopsy, have completed work on their seventh studio album, "Tourniquets, Hacksaws and Graves," set to be unleashed in North America on April 29th via Peaceville Records.
 
"Tourniquets Tighten... Hacksaws Rip... Graves Are Filled. This is Autopsy... This is Death Metal. With the stench of 'The Headless Ritual' still permeating the befouled air, Autopsy has once again come for your very metal soul with their newest blood soaked homage to all things dark, twisted and horrific... once again bone crushingly heavy nightmares await. 'Tourniquets, Hacksaws and Graves' will awaken the most depraved part of the coldest zombie's stare, blood will flow, brains will be destroyed, coffin lids will be opened."
 
 
 
Tourniquets, Hacksaws and Graves was recorded at Fantasy Studios with producer, Adam Munoz, and sees a continuation of Autopsy's pursuit of the ultimate in metallic horror and extremity, featuring the longstanding combo of Eric Cutler and Danny Coralles on guitars, Joe Trevisano on bass and Chris Reifert on drums/vocals. From all-out death metal savagery to crawling, doom-filled sludgery, Tourniquets, Hacksaws and Graves further pushes the limits of taste and brutality with this latest relentless onslaught of terror from beyond the grave.
 
Artwork comes courtesy of Wes Benscoter, who was also previously responsible for the stunning Macabre Eternal album cover.
 
Some Questions For Chris Reifert:
 
SDM:  Can you describe the exact gear you were using during this tracking.
 
Chris: Sure, it's my black Premier Cabria kit, which is an 8 piece. Two kicks, four racks, one floor and one snare. I'd have to check, but I think the snare is a Rogers though. The cymbals are Zildjan and Sabian. It's getting to be in bad shape due to 14 years or so of abuse! Haha! 
 

SDM:  How long did tracking take and how was it tracked? mics, triggers, both, to tape or all digital?
 
Chris: Normally it takes a day and a half to two days to get an album's worth of drum tracks done. Never more than that. That's of course with the rhythm guitars and bass being recorded at the same time, mind you. And I mean keepers, not scratch or guide tracks. The way we work is we show up quite well rehearsed and go for a take live and if the drums are good to go, it's in the pocket. Any little guitar goobers can be patched in afterward, so ultimately it's the drumming performance that dictates if a track is good or garbage to start with. How do we track? With guitar and bass amps, a kit and some mics, and that's it. I don't know what type of mics were used, that's not my department, honestly. I've been very outspoken about my contempt for triggers, though. Haha! It's just not necessary, ya know? When you do that, it's NOT the sound of the actual drumming. There's nothing wrong with sounding like a human being, in my opinion. Did Keith Moon, John Bonham or Bill Ward need triggers to get the blistering sounds they got? I think not. Anyways, analog is wonderful, but at Fantasy we are confident in Adam's ability to capture our madness digitally, while keeping all the real sounds of a real band in a real room, which is extremely important to us.
 
SDM:  Your thoughts on sound replacement software? wish it never existed?
 
Chris: Hey, if that's your bag, go for it. I just don't get it, personally. I think I've drilled that point home already but dammit, I do feel like a complete alien sometimes in a musically computerized world. Bottom line, I like it when what you hear sounds like what you played. 'Nuff said about that, eh?
 
SDM:  What's your favorite old-school raw drum sound? Which band and album or albums?
 
Chris: The list is endless. Here's a little chunk, though.....the first two Trouble albums, Slayer "Reign in Blood" and "Hell Awaits", DRI "Dealing With It", Ramones "Road to Ruin", any of the first three Cactus albums, Iron Maiden "Killers" and "Number of the Beast", Zoetrope "Amnesty", the first Captain Beyond album, The Who "Who's Next" and "Quadrophenia", Kiss "Rock and Roll Over", Alice Cooper "Schools Out", the first few Black Sabbath albums, any Zeppelin album....that's just a few of the more obvious heavy hitters that come to mind right away. I could get really obscure and list tons of stuff that lots of folks have never heard of that would turn their brains into runny cream cheese, but I'll keep it somewhat accessible for this one just to get the point across. Just do one thing....imagine any of those albums I just mentioned with computer perfect triggered and/or sampled drums with the personality sucked right out of them and ask yourself if they'd have made the same impact that way instead of as they were originally? If the answer is yes, you need to get your fucking ears checked.
 
SDM:  One piece of advice to younger kids about to record an album?
 
Chris: Do everything you can to make the record you always wanted to hear but never existed until the possibility was deftly placed into your sweaty hands. Play like your life is on the line and don't settle for anything but the best of what your vision is calling for. Ignore everything else, because it just doesn't matter. And most of all, make sure you enjoy yourself. If you're not doing that, there's no point to any of this, is there?

 
Nick Menza - Megadeth - Holy Wars - Isolating The Throne
Monday, 07 April 2014 17:11
Rust in Peace was the fourth studio album by Megadeth and was released on September 24, 1990 by Capitol Records. The album was produced by Mike Clink. Rust in Peace is the first album to feature guitarist Marty Friedman and drummer Nick Menza, following the departure of Jeff Young and Chuck Behler in 1989. This isolated drum track is 'Holy Wars', which was one of the two singles released from the album. The album was nominated for Best Metal Performance at the 33rd annual Grammy Awards.
 
A remixed and remastered version featuring four bonus tracks was released in 2004. In addition, in January 2010, the band announced a North American tour to commemorate the album's 20th anniversary. Their performance at the Hollywood Palladium was filmed and released as Rust in Peace Live on CD, DVD and Blu-ray later that year.
 
This is the first of three isolated tracks Nick Menza sent us, so be sure to bookmark this page and check back for the others, as well as other tracks on the way from many, many amazing drummers.
 
 
 
Some Questions For Nick:
 
SDM:  Do you remember the exact gear you were using during this tracking?
 
Nick:  I used the Drum Doctor (Ross Garfield) He brought in the drumkit and tuned it every day for me. I learned so much from Ross, he has always got the drums and great knowledge of drums, gear and tuning. Everybody used Drum Doctor for most sessions in USA, mostly in the LA area anyway.
 
The Rust In Peace Kit:
 
(2) 24" Noble & Cooley kicks
14" Ludwig Black Beauty Snare (used on 6 or 7 of the tracks)
14" Custom Brass Snare (rest of the tracks )
10", 12", 14", 16", 18"  Gretsch Rosewood Toms
24" Zildjian Megabell Ride
(2) 18", (2) 19", (2) 20" Zildjian  Z Crashes     
15" Zildjian K-Brilliant Hi-hats 
 
It was a great sounding and playing drumkit.
 

SDM:  How long did tracking take and how was it tracked? mics, triggers, both, to tape or all digital?
 
Nick:  24 hours. Analog  2" tape and I did all the drums in 10 days :)   
 
SDM:  Has anything changed in your setup since this tracking?
 
Nick:  Of course, I'm always change my setup around. Always making it better
 
SDM:  Your thoughts on sound replacement software? wish it never existed?
 
Nick:  Lol It's cool, you still have to play it! If it sucks it's still gonna suck with sound replacement! you cant polish a turd!
 
SDM:  What's your favorite old-school raw drum sound? Which band and album or albums?
 
Nick: 
 
Led Zeppelin - Physical Graffetti
Rush - Carress of steel, Hemispheres, Permanent Waves and Moving Pictures
Van Halen - 1 & 2 and Diver Down
Ozzy Osbourne - Blizzard of Oz and Diary of a Madman
Scorpions - Blackout
Iron Maiden - Number of The Beast
Judas Priest - Screaming for Vengence,
Loudness - Thunder In The East
        
SDM:  One piece of advice to younger kids about to record an album?
 
Nick:  Be prepared, get new drumheads and most of all... have the most fun possible.

 


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